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20130115
20130123
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Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)
of the american voting public and the winner had the advantage of a weak opponent. franklin roosevelt won his second term landslide because of huge popularity. and many of our presidential elections, the candidates are in a fitted title to present themselves as the one capable of serving the country with the winner is walking off with the modern maturity. the customary wisdom that the campaign between the incumbent president and his opponent will be either a referendum on the first term of the president or a judgment of which candidate would be the better theater. is there really a difference between these two considerations? is it not boil down to judging the leadership skill of the incumbent based on effectiveness during his first term versus the unknown leadership skills of the challenger. it's easy to point to the national security or economic consequences impact on the ratings have been in combat as the indicator of the popular view of a sitting president. the public was not over enchanted with the war in iraq when george w. bush ran for reelection. against john kerry, but voted by a sma
's a ritual. there's a lot of celebrities in the crowd. i learned he join us franklin roosevelt as the only president to take the oath four times. he did it over two terms though. >> do you want to explain that? >> well he did it twice the first time because of roberts and then he did it twice this time because of sunday. >> yesterday, roberts read from a piece of paper when he administered the formal oath. >> it's experience. you learn from experience. today it will be how obama tackles the speech. in the past it has been a volley and government. the democrats typically say, well, government can do this or can't do that ask so it's really a series of arguments over the role of government and the second thing i'm curious to know about is how tough they were in a pretty partisan atmosphere. he has gotten tougher over the past couple of years with the opposition. how feist you he is he during the speech. >> things people have picked up in this run up to this inauguration is that the president four years ago in his speech came tout and he actually made a comment about how he was going to to br
suddenly finds he has less power than he thought he had. franklin park zoo in -- franklin roosevelt in 1937, more democratic congress than in any time of the century suddenly realize that the supreme court can keep on overruling the things he gets passed through congress so he tries to pack the supreme court, slapped down, bad second term. in nixon's case-- and i think bob woodward can speak on this, too-- at the beginning of his time he had both houses of congress in democratic hands. he was turning to something called impoundment saying i'm just not going to spend the money for these bills, these acts, these agencies that democrats are voting for in the house and senate and even in the absence of watergate it's possible that that could have gone to impeachment. >> rose: jon meacham in nashville, thomas jonathan van everyson after a successful first term in which the louisiana purchase was dominant he goes into the second term and what happens? >> well his second inaugural address is largely an attack on the press so he set a tone there. every subsequent president has wanted to do that, ma
historian, he will have taken four oaths, puts him at the same league at fdr. >> that is right. franklin roosevelt took the oath four times and bit of a fluke for a president who is limited to two terms to take it four times. that is what happens when you have it last time and repeat it and, of course, we had january 20th fall on sunday which is private ceremony today. >> eric: you have written about the resolution and founding fathers. what do you think they would say if they came back and turn the tv and watched what is going to happen tomorrow? >> i think they would be thrilled that so many american people can watch the peaceful transfer of power under the u.s. constitution. that is really what an inauguration is all about. >> eric: george washington wore ra brown suited and white silk stockings, and he had a sword. can you imagine if the president came out with a sword? and it was the same sense of history and love of our country that has continued through all these years? >> yes, the love of country and patriotism, things are different but obviously washington's first inaugural was
it a second time so now a third time, tomorrow a fourth time. you'd thing it was franklin roosevelt. >> he is president. >> that's right. he had practiced so many times for that moment. we know how he felt. so, matt, tomorrow, what will you be looking for? what's the first thing you want to be -- you want to make sure you're sitting and watching. >> i think the first thing you watch for when both the president and the first lady come out of church. we sort of get the first glimpse as they do that but in the end what we all want to hear what's going to be in his inaugural address, how will he address a country incredibly divided and went through a rough and tumble campaign cycle and struggles in congress. what is he going to say to congress and the country? many inaugurals have gone down very well. some have not been well. >> abc's jon karl covers the white house and the president for us and, of course, we all are waiting for that inaugural address, but coming up to this inauguration day, the president struck quite a confrontational tone with congress. >> reporter: he sure has. also feels p
. in a few hours. >> chris: franklin roosevelt started the custom and st. john's, across lafayette square from the white house has been linked to presidents almost two centuries. >> it has a special place, because as everyone says, location, location, location... >> chris: who was the first president to worship here. >> james madison, the first president when the church was finished in 1816. >> chris: how many presidents have worshipped here, since then. >> every one. >> chris: during the civil war lincoln worshipped at st. john's on sunday evenings. >> president lincoln would come after the service had started, sit in the very back pew of the church. >> chris: back there. >> in the very back of the church and he didn't want to deserve the congregation while they were worshipping, so he came late and left early. >> chris: but madison sat in the middle of the church in pew 54. and that has become the president's pew. >> when word gets out that the president is coming to worship you almost feel like the church will tilt over on one side because so many people are on that one side. >> chris:
of franklin roosevelt where fdr in 1937 said be proud you're an individual but there's also a collective. and you guys mentioned the word people, how often he said, we, the people. but this is, we, the people almost in a howard zimm people of america kind of way. this was about ordinary people fighting for ordinary rights, stonewall has replaced normandy. you know, selma has replaced iwo jima. there wasn't a marshal tone, this was about inclusion. >> he used the term we, and he used the term common creed over and over again throughout the speech. norah o'donnell was listening to the speech down there on the national mall. nor norah? >> and, scott, on that theme the president used the word together some seven times. a word he used just once in 2009. and i think you're right, this was in some ways a civil rights speech. because the president said, our journey is not complete. that's the message on this martin luther king day. and he said when times change, so must we. so i think all of those things are right. and he said, you know, it's not what binds this nation together is not the color
crowds. but in 1945, franklin roosevelt called off the big party when world war ii was raging. douglas brinkley, historian. >> that was a very unique year and most normal situations even if we're in recession or in a foreign war, we still throw pretty big inaugurals. >> for maurice madden, it is mainly a big moment. >> i do believe that if i'm blessed to live to be an old man, i'll be able to look back on all of this and say i know that i was, you know, a part of american history and that really means a lot to me. >> a big part of his american journey. tom foreman, cnn, washington. try running four.ning a restaurant is hard, fortunately we've got ink. it gives us 5x the rewards on our internet, phone charges and cable, plus at office supply stores. rewards we put right back into our business. this is the only thing we've ever wanted to do and ink helps us do it. make your mark with ink from chase. [ male announcer ] can a car be built around a state of mind? ♪ announcing the all-new 2013 malibu from chevrolet. ♪ with a remarkable new interior featuring the available chevrolet mylin
franklin d. roosevelt to take the oath of office four times. in 2009, he took the oath twice because, in a do-over, performed the day after chief justice john roberts tripped on his lines during the first inauguration. >> within a few days, the president will be walking from that part of the capitol right here, and then down these stairs. >> suarez: new york democratic senator chuck schumer is chairman of the joint congressional committee on inaugural ceremonies, which oversees all of the inaugural rituals related to the capitol. >> there's no tanks in the streets, there's no rioting or picketing or protesting. it's a beautiful thing about america that the inauguration reminds us of. with all the trouble we have, the inauguration symbolizes that the republic marches onward. >> suarez: the president's inauguration will begin, as it did four years ago, with a national day of service tomorrow where people will be encouraged to pledge a year's effort to community organizations. at the inauguration itself, there are a few firsts. >> 150 years after the emancipation proclamation was signed
her husband franklin delano roosevelt was president, eleanor roosevelt was the first, first lady to hold her own press conference and these press conferences came with a catch, for women reporters only. women were typically barred from the presidential press conferences, and so mrs. roosevelt only allowed women to attend hers. nearly 70 years after fdr, and we see a lot of women covering the white house, but among the five major networks, four still employ men as the chief white house correspondent. so folks who sit on the front row in the white house briefing room are still mostly fellows including our own chuck todd. and jessica yellin and brianna keel er are from cnn and joining them on the front row is julia pace. i want to come back to the white house to talk about this question, because if women in the room matter and we are all critiquing the president's picture, the fact is that the room is full of a lot of guys, too. >> we were on the campaign trail together, nia, and i and there were a lot of women in the campaign bus, and it was not boys on the bus anymore. this is a t
Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)